The difference between a page and a post

By Anne White

There are two core components of a WordPress site: Pages and Posts. Pages and posts are similar, and both have the function of presenting content for your website users to read. Both can contain atoms and modules. However, there are some fundamental differences between the two which mean they are used very differently on your site.

Pages:

Pages are static. They are not organised depending upon the time they are created, meaning the date that they are published does not have an effect on their position on the site. Their order on the site, and their content, should generally not be changed. This means that they are usually used for content that does not change on a regular basis, and for pages that are regularly accessed by users.

Pages are hierarchal in nature. This means that you can create sub-pages through the use of Parent and Child pages. For example, you may have an “About” page with sub-pages for “Team Members”, “Company Motto”, and “History of the Company”. Again, these are all pages that will probably not change on a regular basis. Parent pages can be set in the “Page Attributes” section of a page, which is unique to pages rather than posts.

The order of pages on your site can be set in the Page order section of “Page Attributes”. For example, if you want your “Homepage” to be displayed first, and your “About” page to be displayed second, you should put “1” in the order field for the “Homepage”, and “2” in the order field for the “About” page.

Due to the fact that pages are more permanent additions to your site, only editors and admins are allowed to create, edit, publish, or delete pages.

A good example of a page is an “About” page, or a “Contact Us” page. In both of these cases the information contained in them is usually not affected by the date they are published and should not change on a regular basis. They are also pages that you would want your users to have quick and easy access to, and to be prominently displayed on the site.

To get started on creating pages with our PageBox for WordPress plugin, take a look at our “Creating a page” guide.

Posts:

Posts are dynamic. They do not stay in a fixed position on the site, instead, they are displayed in reverse chronological order, with the newest created posts being displayed first. This means that posts should be used for any content that is updated on a regular basis, such as news articles or events, that can become old or outdated.

Posts are organised through the use of categories and tags. Categories and tags group posts together and allow site users to navigate and access them easily. Although posts are not hierarchal, categories are, and you can create sub-categories through the use of Parent and Child categories.

Due to the fact that posts are more temporary in nature, they have a much broader range of users who can create, edit, publish and delete posts. See the “Difference between WordPress user types” guide for more information on the different user roles.

A good example of a post is a news article, or an event. A news article is only relevant for a limited amount of time, and will become outdated relatively quickly. Similarly, an event occurs at a specific time and after this will no longer be relevant to your site. Therefore, you do not want these to be displayed above more current articles or events.

To get started on creating posts with our PageBox for WordPress plugin, take a look at our “Creating a post” guide.

Pages vs. Posts:

  • Pages are static whereas posts are dynamic.
  • Pages do not change position or content on a regular basis whereas posts are displayed in reverse chronological order, with the newest post displayed first.
  • Pages are hierarchal whereas posts are grouped together through the use of categories and tags.
  • Pages can only be created by editors and admins whereas posts can be created and edited by a number of different users.